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Larry Cohen, DPM

July 2020

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Published in Blog
Monday, 27 July 2020 00:00

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

The plantar fascia is a thick band of fibrous tissue that connects the heel to the toes along the bottom of the foot. Since the plantar fascia works as a shock absorber and arch support, it can become painful when it is overloaded or overstressed.  This pain is known as plantar fasciitis.  Research has shown that pain is most commonly located on the inside of the heel and occurs during weight-bearing activities.  A podiatrist will be able to examine the foot and heel for further issues, particularly a stress fracture.  A podiatrist may also take X-rays or use an ultrasound machine to determine the extent of the injury. Some treatment options may include rest, a change in footwear, orthotics or physical therapy.  If you believe that you may be afflicted with plantar fasciitis, it is important to check with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Larry Cohen  from New York City. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
Published in Blog
Monday, 20 July 2020 00:00

Ways to Improve Poor Circulation

The circulatory system transports oxygen, nutrients, and blood throughout the body. Poor circulation is when blood flow to various parts of the body is inadequate. Frequently, poor circulation occurs in the legs and feet. Fortunately, there are ways you can improve poor circulation. Eating a balanced diet, drinking more water, exercising, and quitting smoking are all actions that you can take to improve your overall health, in addition to improving your circulation. Elevating your feet, getting a foot massage, taking warm baths, using a compression garment can also improve poor circulation. You should also see your doctor regularly for checkups to monitor your circulation. If you experience poor circulation to your legs and feet, a podiatrist can also help by finding treatments that work for you.

Poor circulation is a serious condition and needs immediate medical attention. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Dr. Larry Cohen of New York City. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs is can be caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is the result of a buildup of plaque in the arteries.

Plaque buildup or atherosclerosis results from excess calcium and cholesterol in the bloodstream. This can restrict the amount of blood which can flow through the arteries. Poor blood circulation in the feet and legs are sometimes caused by inflammation in the blood vessels, known as vasculitis.

Causes

Lack of oxygen and oxygen from poor blood circulation restricts muscle growth and development. It can also cause:

  • Muscle pain, stiffness, or weakness   
  • Numbness or cramping in the legs 
  • Skin discoloration
  • Slower nail & hair growth
  • Erectile dysfunction

Those who have diabetes or smoke are at greatest risk for poor circulation, as are those who are over 50. If you have poor circulation in the feet and legs it may be caused by PAD and is important to make changes to your lifestyle in order to reduce risk of getting a heart attack or stroke. Exercise and maintaining a healthy lifestyle will dramatically improve conditions.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment of Poor Blood Circulation in the Feet
Published in Blog
Monday, 13 July 2020 00:00

Possible Techniques to Prevent Falling

Research has indicated that people who are sixty five years of age or older may experience frequent falls. Many of these falls can be fatal, or may lead to serious injuries. Falling may cause a fear of completing daily activities, and this may invoke a loss of independence. There are measures that can be implemented that can help to prevent falling. These can include improving home lighting and removing worn rugs from the living environment. It is important to receive routine physical examinations, which can also help to monitor existing medication. Additionally, it may help to ensure that hearing and vision are adequate. It is beneficial to perform a gentle exercise routine, which can help the patient to become stronger. If you would like more information about how falling can affect the feet, please consult with a podiatrist.

Preventing falls among the elderly is very important. If you are older and have fallen or fear that you are prone to falling, consult with Dr. Larry Cohen from New York City. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality advice and care.

Every 11 seconds, an elderly American is being treated in an emergency room for a fall related injury. Falls are the leading cause of head and hip injuries for those 65 and older. Due to decreases in strength, balance, senses, and lack of awareness, elderly persons are very susceptible to falling. Thankfully, there are a number of things older persons can do to prevent falls.

How to Prevent Falls

Some effective methods that older persons can do to prevent falls include:

  • Enrolling in strength and balance exercise program to increase balance and strength
  • Periodically having your sight and hearing checked
  • Discuss any medications you have with a doctor to see if it increases the risk of falling
  • Clearing the house of falling hazards and installing devices like grab bars and railings
  • Utilizing a walker or cane
  • Wearing shoes that provide good support and cushioning
  • Talking to family members about falling and increasing awareness

Falling can be a traumatic and embarrassing experience for elderly persons; this can make them less willing to leave the house, and less willing to talk to someone about their fears of falling. Doing such things, however, will increase the likelihood of tripping or losing one’s balance. Knowing the causes of falling and how to prevent them is the best way to mitigate the risk of serious injury.  

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Falls Prevention
Published in Blog
Monday, 06 July 2020 00:00

Location of Pain From Cuboid Syndrome

Pain and discomfort that exists from cuboid syndrome is generally felt on the outer edge of the foot, which is the same  side of your little toe. The cuboid bone is one of several small bones located in each foot, and may become dislocated from overuse, or from frequently participating in running and jumping activities. Since it is sometimes difficult to pinpoint exactly where pain is coming from, this condition is often misdiagnosed or confused with a stress fracture. When a proper evaluation is performed, the correct treatment can begin. If you are experiencing pain around the middle of the foot, or at the base of the fourth and fifth toes, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can guide you toward effectively treating this condition.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Larry Cohen from New York City. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Cuboid Syndrome
Published in Blog
Wednesday, 01 July 2020 00:00

It's Time for Beautiful Feet

You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails. Step outside without worrying about the appearance of your feet.

Published in Blog
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