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Larry Cohen, DPM

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Monday, 10 August 2020 00:00

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a medical condition in which the blood vessels in your lower limbs narrow or become clogged due to the buildup of arterial plaque. This reduction in blood flow means that you have poor circulation, which increases your risk of developing a whole host of potentially serious medical complications, including strokes, heart attacks, and aneurysms. Left undiagnosed and untreated, PAD in your lower limbs can advance to the point where there is limited to no blood flow, resulting in the death of the muscles in your lower limbs and increasing your risk of needing a limb amputation. Fortunately, PAD is easy to screen for and can usually be managed with lifestyle changes and medication, especially if it is detected in its earliest stages. Symptoms of PAD in the lower limbs include pain or cramping while walking, swelling, numbness, skin discoloration, and poorly healing sores. If you experience any of these symptoms, it is strongly recommended that you consult with a podiatrist who can screen for PAD and provide you with treatment options.   

Peripheral artery disease can pose a serious risk to your health. It can increase the risk of stroke and heart attack. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, consult with Dr. Larry Cohen from New York City. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is when arteries are constricted due to plaque (fatty deposits) build-up. This results in less blood flow to the legs and other extremities. The main cause of PAD is atherosclerosis, in which plaque builds up in the arteries.

Symptoms

Symptoms of PAD include:

  • Claudication (leg pain from walking)
  • Numbness in legs
  • Decrease in growth of leg hair and toenails
  • Paleness of the skin
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Sores and wounds on legs and feet that won’t heel
  • Coldness in one leg

It is important to note that a majority of individuals never show any symptoms of PAD.

Diagnosis

While PAD occurs in the legs and arteries, Podiatrists can diagnose PAD. Podiatrists utilize a test called an ankle-brachial index (ABI). An ABI test compares blood pressure in your arm to you ankle to see if any abnormality occurs. Ultrasound and imaging devices may also be used.

Treatment

Fortunately, lifestyle changes such as maintaining a healthy diet, exercising, managing cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and quitting smoking, can all treat PAD. Medications that prevent clots from occurring can be prescribed. Finally, in some cases, surgery may be recommended.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Peripheral Artery Disease
Monday, 03 August 2020 00:00

People who often get blisters on the feet are aware of the discomfort they may cause. Blisters are a small area that can resemble a bubble that forms over the damaged skin. This is filled with fluid that protects the raw skin, and will gradually drain when the healing process is completed. There are several reasons why blisters on the feet can develop, including wearing shoes that do not fit properly, excessive sweating that may come from wearing shoes that are made of non-breathable materials, or from not wearing socks. Research has indicated that it may be beneficial to moisturize the feet prior to wearing shoes. This may help prevent existing blisters from becoming worse. If you get frequent blisters on the feet, it is suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can guide you toward effective prevention and treatment techniques.

Blisters are prone to making everyday activities extremely uncomfortable. If your feet are hurting, contact Dr. Larry Cohen of New York City. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Foot Blisters

Foot blisters develop as a result of constantly wearing tight or ill-fitting footwear. This happens due to the constant rubbing from the shoe, which can often lead to pain.

What Are Foot Blisters?

A foot blister is a small fluid-filled pocket that forms on the upper-most layer of the skin. Blisters are filled with clear fluid and can lead to blood drainage or pus if the area becomes infected.

How Do Blisters Form?

Blisters on the feet are often the result of constant friction of skin and material, usually by shoe rubbing. Walking in sandals, boots, or shoes that don’t fit properly for long periods of time can result in a blister. Having consistent foot moisture and humidity can easily lead to blister formation.

Prevention & Treatment

It is important to properly care for the affected area in order to prevent infection and ease the pain. Do not lance the blister and use a Band-Aid to provide pain relief. Also, be sure to keep your feet dry and wear proper fitting shoes. If you see blood or pus in a blister, seek assistance from a podiatrist.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Blisters
Friday, 31 July 2020 00:00

Your feet are covered most of the day. If you're diabetic, periodic screening is important for good health. Numbness is often a sign of diabetic foot and can mask a sore or wound.

Monday, 27 July 2020 00:00

The plantar fascia is a thick band of fibrous tissue that connects the heel to the toes along the bottom of the foot. Since the plantar fascia works as a shock absorber and arch support, it can become painful when it is overloaded or overstressed.  This pain is known as plantar fasciitis.  Research has shown that pain is most commonly located on the inside of the heel and occurs during weight-bearing activities.  A podiatrist will be able to examine the foot and heel for further issues, particularly a stress fracture.  A podiatrist may also take X-rays or use an ultrasound machine to determine the extent of the injury. Some treatment options may include rest, a change in footwear, orthotics or physical therapy.  If you believe that you may be afflicted with plantar fasciitis, it is important to check with a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

Plantar fasciitis can be very painful and inconvenient. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Larry Cohen  from New York City. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is the inflammation of the thick band of tissue that runs along the bottom of your foot, known as the plantar fascia, and causes mild to severe heel pain.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Non-supportive shoes
  • Overpronation
  • Repeated stretching and tearing of the plantar fascia

How Can It Be Treated?

  • Conservative measures – anti-inflammatories, ice packs, stretching exercises, physical therapy, orthotic devices
  • Shockwave therapy – sound waves are sent to the affected area to facilitate healing and are usually used for chronic cases of plantar fasciitis
  • Surgery – usually only used as a last resort when all else fails. The plantar fascia can be surgically detached from the heel

While very treatable, plantar fasciitis is definitely not something that should be ignored. Especially in severe cases, speaking to your doctor right away is highly recommended to avoid complications and severe heel pain. Your podiatrist can work with you to provide the appropriate treatment options tailored to your condition.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
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